Course literature - All Master courses autumn 2019

 

Introduction to Global Political Economy (15 cred.)

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of global political economy. A historical perspective is adopted to bridge the gaps in the intellectual traditions in GPE and provide the necessary conceptual tools to the study of GPE. The students will be equipped with deeper understanding of and historical perspective on pressing issues in a fast changing global political economy – e.g. trade and liberalization, emerging markets, monetary & financial system, gender, environment and global governance.

Course coordinators: Gonzalo Pozo Martin

 

The Global Political Economy of Development (15 cred.)

This module will provide an international and inter-disciplinary overview of the major issues surrounding development theory and practice in the XXth and XXIst centuries. The two specific objectives we try to achieve in this module are: (1) deepening of students’ theoretical understanding of the concept of development, as a field of global political economy; and (2) a critical assessment of the results and future prospects of economic and political development. The students taking this optional module will gain the knowledge to critically evaluate the changing nature of development and development studies as a discipline, as well as to critically examine the practice/policy and guiding principles of developmental agendas today. The whole course is framed by a strong background in Global Political Economy (the core course in the MA) and deep historical and critical perspective on development.

Course coordinators: Gonzalo Pozo Martin, Akhil Malaki, Mattias Lindgren

 

Gendering Global Political Economy: Contemporary and Historical Perspectives (15 cred.)

This module will provide a critical, international and inter-disciplinary overview of the role of gender, gender representations and gender relations of inequality in Global Political Economy. The two specific objectives in this module are: (1) deepening of students’ theoretical understanding of the concept of gender in the fields of economic history and global political economy; and (2) a critical assessment of some essential themes in which the field of global political economy has moved into the critique of gender: from women in work, production and consumption to the theme of social reproduction; from migration, prostitution, trafficking and women the informal economy, to issues in military labour and the discursive construction of “libidinal economies”. The students taking this optional module will gain the knowledge to critically evaluate the changing nature of gender critiques, as well as to critically examine a number of gender issues driving the world economy today. The whole course is framed by a strong background in Global Political Economy (the core course in the MA) and deep historical and critical perspective on gender.

Course coordinator: Fia Sundevall

 

Philosophy of Social Sciences (7,5 cred.)

This course will provide a basic introduction to epistemologies used in social science research and how to conceive of the relationship between theory and empirical material. The course explains the relationship between inductive and deductive approaches, subjective and objective realities, and differentiation based on social background, trajectory, and ideological approach. We will explain the role of norms, methods of framing and basic ideas related to the politics of research as well as the sociology of knowledge. We will address frameworks—using the philosophies of science, history and social science—that attempt to integrate and balance induction and deduction, subjective and objective standpoints, and sociological position (orstructures) with trajectory (or agency). 

Course coordinator: Jonathan Feldman

 

Qualitative Methods (7,5 cred.)     

This course provides student with essential knowledge of qualitative research concepts and techniques in preparation for thesis writing. Using the framework of research considerations (epistemologies, theories, methodologies, and methods) it touches upon the first two issues but concentrates on the latter two). Under the overarching theme of designing a social science research project, the course covers the following themes: generating knowledge, working with theory, applying qualitative methods, verifying sources, and writing-up results. In covering these topics, the course requires students to read and engage with qualitative methods literature along with their own topic-specific literature.

Course coordinator: Mark Rhinard and Jonathan Feldman

 

Quantitative Methods (7,5 cred.)

The aim of the course is to provide students a deeper understanding of how statistical and econometrical methods can be used in economic history and international relations. The course presupposes some basic training in statistical methods that is provided at the Department of Economic History at the basic level. The course deals with probability theory, ordinary least square, non-parametric tests, the F-statistic, simple and multiple regression, correlation, confidence intervals, dummy variables, lagged variables, heteroscedastic, multicollinearity, non-linear regression, time series analysis, and autocorrelation.

Course coordinator: Rodney Edvinsson

 

Independent Study Course in EH/IR (7,5 cred.)

In preparation for independent work in economic history or international relations, the student writes a research review in some research field related to the department's research focus. The purpose of this course is to enable students to achieve a deeper, critical ability to evaluate scientific literature.

Course coordinator: Mattias Lindgren

 

Master's Thesis/Essay Course in Economic History or International Relations (30 cred.)

Structure and present a scientific essay within the field of either Economic History or International Relations.

During the course the students shall:

  • Structure and present a scientific essay within the field of either Economic History or International Relations.
  • Critically evaluate different types of sources and source materials.
  • Compare, integrate and apply theories/arguments.
  • Demostrate connections between research problem, theory, method and results.
  • Defend the results orally and argue their validity.
  • Analyze and discuss the results of fellow students.

Course coordinator: Gonzalo Pozo Martin

Students must have fulfilled the following courses at the advanced level: "Philosophy of Social Science" (7,5 hp) and "Qualtiative methods" (7,5 hp) and "Quantative methods", respectively (7,5 hp).

 

Internship in Economic History/International Relations (15 or 30 cred.)

The course will include two-month internship at an agency, company or organization - private or public. This course aims to enhance students' employability by affording them the opportunity to use their theoretical knowledge in practice. The trainee must be in consultation with employers and supervisors implement a project in which she/he applies his knowledge of the subject in an area of relevance to the labor market. The results are reported in an activity report which shall include at least 10 pages. For more information: Internship Course

Contact: praktik@ekohist.su.se

Course coordinator: Jonatan Stiglund